Bail Bonds

What You Need To Know About Bail Bonds

Bail bonds are a legal arrangement under which an individual or group of people promises to repay a third party, called the bailor. This is in the case where the individual or group has been arrested or released from prison while under judicial proceedings. Bail bondsmen or bail bond agents will act as a guarantor and guarantee money or property to a third party. The guarantee often consists of a percentage of the bail money or a specific amount of money that will be paid directly to the bailor if the person is released from prison.

Here is what you need to know about bail bonds

How Bail Bonds Are Used

In some cases, a defendant or individual who is charged with a crime will appear in court without a lawyer. Instead, the defendant will make a cash promise to a bond company or another individual. If the defendant shows up to court and maintains their full amount of bail, this individual will then be released from jail once their trial has begun. In many states, this is often done after the judge has been recessed.

In exchange for the assurance, the defendant will appear in court, the bail bondsmen will offer collateral. This may include some type of property, such as a home or vehicle, or it could be some type of asset that’s of value to the bail bondsman. Most often, the collateral is some form of money. However, cash is not always used. In many states, real estate or other forms of collateral may also be used.

How Bail Bonds Are Used

Collateral Payment

Usually, the bondsman will post a cashier’s check for the full bail amount when the defendant posts a bond with them. However, sometimes, the bond broker or court may post a check for an additional amount if certain instances occur. For instance, if the defendant flees before their trial is completed or they miss one court appearance, the court may require the defendant to repay the full bail amount.

Some bail bond companies or bonding agents advertise their services online. Others can be found in newspapers and on television. Often, people who post bail online will provide personal information about themselves and their circumstances. Such information can include their name, address, phone number, and work location, among others. Some may also provide contact information for their family members and friends. Some defendants prefer not to meet with the bondsman or discuss the details of their case until they’ve met face to face.

Bail bond services, such as Bail Bonds Bros, are available 24 hours a day. Such services are reliable and dependable because you never know when you need access to such services. Having to wait for specific operating hours may prolong an already stressful process.

Collateral Payment

Meeting With The Bondsman

It’s important to remember that although the defendant has a choice as to whether or not to meet with the bondsman or discuss their case, meeting with the person or discussing their case is always better than not meeting at all. The defendant’s loved ones may have valuable information that can help the defendant avoid jail time. It may also help to find out what type of collateral will be most beneficial to the defendant. For instance, some people may choose to post a larger amount of money than others because they have a larger home or other valuable property.

Meeting With The Bondsman

Collateral Amount

Generally, the more collateral a person offers, the higher their chances of avoiding jail. Most of the time, the state requires 10% of the defendant’s salary as bail amounts. If the defendant doesn’t show up for their trial, the court will then determine the bail bonds. This amount is usually lower than what the person would pay if they were to post bail on their own.

Conclusion

Finding reliable bondsmen is the most important part of the process. Bondsmen that are reliable at any moment you need their services mean that your process doesn’t have to be longer than it needs to be. Collateral can be in the form of cash or property, depending on the circumstance and service providers.

Make sure to meet with the bondsmen, if possible, for a face-to-face conversation for detail and to explore various options regarding collateral and unique circumstances.

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