Menu
X
image

How Can a Father Get Full Custody of Their Child?

It’s estimated that more than a quarter of all children 21 and under in the United States live with one parent.

Custody hearings can be long, emotionally draining, and costly. The process can be even more stressful for fathers.

In the past mother’s were heavily favored in getting full custody, but times have changed. It’s possible for a father to get full custody if he meets the right criteria.

If you’ve been Googling the phrase “How can a father get full custody?” your search is over. We’re going to tell you what you need to do to get full custody of your children.

How Can a Father Get Full Custody?

Getting full custody is a long process. Aside from having to prove that you’re the fittest parent for full custody, you also have to prove why the mother isn’t.

You must also have a very good track record with your kids and the law. You’ll also need a good custody lawyer.

The battle may be long, but the end results will be worth it. If you’re ready to fight for full custody of your children, make sure you follow these tips.

Make Child Support Payments

This can be a bit of a financial burden for you, but it’ll help your case.

It’s important to keep in mind that child support isn’t just giving your ex a check or cash every month. It’s money that’s supposed to support your child, and paying it shows that you’re a caring father.

If you have an informal support agreement, make sure you save any receipts of transactions. It may also be a good idea to call or text whenever you send money so you have more proof that you were paying support.

Be Realistic

When you ask yourself, “How can a father get full custody?” sometimes you need to ask yourself if the father should have full custody.

It can be hard to be away from your children, but your living situation may not be the most stable for them.

When the judge decides on custody, they take into account how the living accommodations will affect the child. The change may be too harsh for them and they may not adapt well.

Do you already have a lot of other children in the house? Do you make enough money to support you and your children? Would they have to move to a different school district if they were to live with you?

Think about how intense the change will be for your children. If it would disrupt their lives too much, it may be better to seek joint custody.

Be Civil

It’s rare for custody battles to be nice, and if you’re searching the phrase “How can a father get full custody?” you could be in for a long and frustrating time.

If you want to look like a good father to the court, you need to keep things civil with your ex. You may be feeling a lot of hurt and anger at the moment, but it’s best to find a different way to work through your feelings.

Keep your communication with your ex strictly about the kids. Don’t be afraid to end the conversation if you feel that your ex is becoming argumentative or too angry.

Build Strong Relationships

If you’re fighting for custody for your children, we’d like to assume that you already have a strong bond with them. Continue to maintain that strong bond, and make sure that other people in your kid’s lives know about it.

Don’t just focus on the relationship with your kids, also think about the relationships that your child has with others.

Take some time to introduce yourself to their teachers and coaches. Chat with their friend’s parents and suggest that you spend some time together.

Showing that you have a strong relationship with your child and people that are important to them will help your case.

Be Honest About Your Reasons

It’s possible to fight an intense custody battle and to also be concerned about your ex at the same time.

There are plenty of fathers that feel guilty about separating their children from their mothers. But if you’re wondering “How can a father get full custody?” you clearly have good reasons for trying to get custody of your children.

When you’re fighting for custody, it’s time to be brutally honest about why you feel that you need it. Don’t hold anything back, or worry about embarrassing or hurting the mother when you’re telling the truth.

Has the mother been neglectful or used alcohol during pregnancy? Has she been verbally or physically abusive towards your children? Let your lawyer and the judge know.

The more honest you are about your reasons for wanting custody, the better off you’ll be.

Maintain Records

When you’re fighting for custody, records and paperwork will help you establish your case.

Don’t just keep track of what you pay in child support, keep track of how much you do you for your children.

Keep track of how many times you pick them up after school. Mention the doctor’s appointments you’ve taken them to, and the medical care you and your insurance helped pay for.

Doing this can establish that you’re an involved parent that already has an established record of helping their child.

Have a Plan

If you’re asking “How can a father get full custody?” having a solid parenting plan is part of the answer.

Raising a kid can be tough in a two-parent household, but things can get more complicated when there’s only one adult. You need to show the judge that you’re ready to handle your child’s needs.

Don’t just focus on the physical aspects of keeping a clean house and giving your child a room. Think about everything you’ll need to account for to care for them the majority of the time.

Have a babysitter lined up if you can’t be there for the kids after school. Outline your budget and how much you have devoted to your child.

Next Steps

Now that you have an answer to the question “How can a father get full custody?” it’s time to take action.

Search for a family law attorney by you with our attorney search tool. Start working on gathering your evidence, and work on following the tips we mentioned in this article.

And remember, if you have any questions feel free to contact us so we can help.

No Tag have Found!
Back To Home
Newsletter
Location

© Copyright 2019 Halt Law Directory | Connecting Attorneys with Clients in Need. All rights reserved.