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Category Archives: Criminal Defense

Learn the equitable justice system through reform, limiting disparities in legal representation, rules, and empowering criminal defense lawyers and attorneys.


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Parole hearing – How it works

The prisoner must have completed the minimum years of confinement as per law before he is eligible for release on parole.

Once the minimum sentence period (ERD) nears, a dossier (parole eligibility report) is prepared. This report includes details of the behavioral changes of an inmate in his prison stay, doctors, psychiatrist’s reports and their other observations on the prisoner.

The parole board is a three-member independent committee under the Ministry Of Justice.

If an inmate is allotted a parole hearing date, the same must be communicated to the victim or his immediate kin via mail or phone. The victim has many ways to voice his/her opinion on his/her tormentor’s parole decision. He / She can submit own opinion on parole prior to the hearing to a designated officer, who summarizes the victim’s verbatim for consideration by the parole board.

At this stage, new facts may emerge which affect the perspective of the parole board. For example, the accused may have been given punishment based on last crime he committed. Other evidence might have been disallowed in this case. However, during the parole hearing, it may become known that the accused had actually been a habitual abuser and not a one-time offender as made out from the last verdict. The attitude of the board is likely to turn negative on this new evidence.

One important aspect is that the parole members pour over many facets of the prisoner, which might not be available or admissible in the court at the verdict time. Close monitoring of the inmate, his behavior for days on end in the prison, his participation in different jail programs, his efforts for freedom in the legal way all come under lenses during the parole board examination.

How can parole be beneficial?

When a person is sent to jail, apart from the victim, innocent members of the accused family also suffer from financial and mental stress. They can be innocent toddlers, children, old-age geriatrics literally left to die after the removal of the person (accused ) from their support system. Without financial, mental support, the children of the accused themselves fall prey to sexual crimes. They may grow up to be criminals themselves. Bringing back the accused member of the family along with work may again tilt the financial and mental support back in the family of accused.

After the jail experience, the value of freedom is magnified to the prisoner. He is much less likely to commit re-crime after this lesson. With gratification for parole, he can even become a contributing member to the society.

The Parole Hearing Process

At first, the inmate interacts with one board member. The board member tries to prod into the psychology of the prisoner and not get swayed by his charm or his apparent normal happy attitude, fit enough for a release.

During the parole, the victim can attend with one support person, but he is not allowed to participate in the hearing process

Most Important – What is considered during this review

The parole hearing places the utmost stress on one question “Is it safe to release the inmate in the community, keeping in mind the grave crime that the prisoner had committed. Have really things changed for the better?”

The parole board goes over all that is documented in the parole dossier; hear what the accused and victims have to say about the parole, new evidence, past incidents, past history of the prisoner. The board listens and reads about the psychiatrist review of the inmate. Detailed, painstaking deliberation of this data helps to arrive at a decision regarding on whether the release of the inmate will raise the potential danger of society or not.

Another painful fact that is considered for parole is whether,on release, the convict will get adequate support to integrate and live in society. If no adequate plans are found to rehabilitee the inmate after his release, then his frustration may force him to re-commit crimes. In such cases where, where no suitable plan can be formulated for a decent life of prisoner after release, he may be asked to stay in jail till suitable resources can be found.

The parole members are under continuous pressure to ensure that their decision to release does not make people lose faith in the judicial process. But, they have to also consider providing the chance for a human reform which is not possible when being fried in jail.

It’s not that denial of parole once ends this facility for the prisoner. In some states, parole reports are sometimes automatically reviewed after a fixed number of years.

After Parole

After parole, the inmate will be under surveillance and report to the parole officer. If not reported within 24 hours of his release from correction home, he will be termed as an absconder.

There are various levels of supervision in parole for various types of crimes committed. For sex offenders, the maximum level of surveillance is maintained.

Conclusion

Parole, in reality,is the second judgment and the process is complex. It does not have a very rigid set of rules like the law court has, and rely much more on the personal perception of the parole board members. With a heavy heart, they have to sometimes deny this truncated right when they are not too sure about the future of the inmate after parole. Being ignorant about the laws can also lead to rejection even when the board member knows that the person in question deserves that chance. So, it’s a non-thankful heavy-hearted decision, which weighs heavily on the board members conscience and can swing anyway after release. However, experienced parole members can sniff out discrepancies in what the prisoner is trying to portray for his release and what he actually thinks in his depths of his criminal mind.

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2 years ago CLE , Criminal Defense

Former Inmate Teaches Attorneys Continuing Legal Education Courses

Criminal defense attorneys are often the sole advocate for their clients. From the moment their client is charged with a criminal offense until the judge completes the sentencing process, the criminal defense attorney is required to use their legal expertise and professional experience to provide their clients with the best service possible. In addition to providing legal counsel, a criminal defense attorney also must be compassionate, empathetic and understanding.

In many cases, empathy can be challenging — especially since the criminal defense attorney has likely never been in the same position as their client. Now, Prison Coach John Fuller is offering criminal defense attorneys the opportunity to learn more about their clients’ perspective while also providing actionable advice for improving their legal services.

John Fuller is a former inmate who now works as a prison coach and motivational speaker. Criminal defense attorneys around the country have found him to be a valuable resource, as he can provide them with a unique perspective into the lives and minds of their clients. 

Benefits of CLE Training with Prison Coach John Fuller

As opposed to other CLE training opportunities that may discuss legal minutiae or industry trends that impact attorneys or their clients, John Fuller’s speaking engagements provide real-life insight into the perspective of those facing criminal charges and those who have been sentenced to a prison term. His personal experience and professional knowledge provide him with the qualifications necessary to take on these issues and to provide attorneys with guidance as they work with their clients.

Criminal defense attorneys who complete training with Prison Coach John Fuller leave their experience with:

  • A better understanding into the perspective of their clients. John Fuller is a former inmate who has spent time in more than 9 different correctional facilities throughout the country, and he has an intimate understanding of what life is like during incarceration. He provides attorneys with insight into the physical and emotional challenges that incarcerated individuals face, which in turn allows attorneys to be more understanding and empathetic with their clients.
  • An ability to prepare their clients for incarceration. Many criminal defense attorneys find themselves faced with a client who has been sentenced to months or years in the prison system, and it can be a difficult conversation to have. By completing training with John Fuller, criminal defense attorneys will be able to provide their clients with specific information that will prepare them for what they will experience once they begin their prison sentence.
  • Actionable tips that they can use to improve their legal practice. In addition to providing attorneys with information that they can relay to their clients, John Fuller gives practical and actionable advice that attorneys can use throughout their experience with clients who are facing criminal charges and possible prison sentences.

As a former inmate, author, public speaker and prison coach, John Fuller is the ideal person to lead a training seminar or conference breakout session. He is a valuable asset to anyone in the legal profession, particularly those who specialize in criminal defense.

Testimonials: What Legal Experts Have to Say About Training with John Fuller

As a prison coach and motivational speaker, John Fuller has had the opportunity to work with criminal defense attorneys from around the country. He has offered training sessions through local bar associations and at private practices that have been well-received by all in attendance. The attorneys who complete his training programs have left with a sense of fulfillment, and they are excited to make the adaptations necessary to provide their clients with a better experience.

Melinda Pendergraph, training director at the Missouri Public Defender’s Office, appreciated the ability to better understand the clients who they work with on a daily basis.

“For me to have the information to explain to them what’s going to happen to them when they go into a prison, it makes all of the difference,” Pendergraph said after a recent training session. “Sometimes it’s hard for our clients to share those experiences, so it was really helpful for me to hear from someone who has been there.”

Not only does John Fuller offer valuable information and additional resources that attorneys can use, he presents it in a manner which is digestible and engaging. 

“His communication was great, the way that he was able to get it across to us — it was very easy to understand,” said Adam Woody, attorney and vice president of the Missouri Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. “It’s very valuable information that without a doubt I’m going to use. I’m going to put it in my toolbox.”

Ultimately, it’s John Fuller’s commitment and dedication that shines through when he is discussing the topic of incarceration with attorneys.

“The passion that he has for it is evident,” said Criminal Defense Attorney Eric Vernon. “The fact that he’s evangelizing — he’s writing books, he’s trying to help people, he’s going out and giving these kinds of talks.” 

About Prison Coach and Motivational Speaker John Fuller

As a young adult, John Fuller lived a life of crime and ended up facing criminal charges that resulted in more than 10 years in prison. He spent time in 9 different correctional facilities, including 5 federal prisons. Upon his release in 2002, he vowed to start his life anew. He began a career as a prison coach, in which he assists individuals facing incarceration and helps to prepare them for the upcoming experience. He encourages his clients to make the best out of this difficult time. In addition, John Fuller is a motivational speaker and a teacher who hopes to help legal professionals better prepare their clients for incarceration.

Prison Coach John Fuller is available to speak at legal conferences, CLE training classes and criminal defense seminars. He has experience speaking to local bar associations, criminal defense organizations and individual law firms. He enjoys traveling around the country and providing attorneys with personal and professional insight that can help them improve their relationships with their clients. 

For more information on booking Prison Coach John Fuller for your next conference, seminar or training experience, contact him today.

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How to Find the Ideal Criminal Defense Lawyer

One of the hardest parts of being involved in a criminal offense is the process of finding the right criminal defense attorney. It is also the most crucial aspect in your effort to prove yourself not guilty of a criminal offense. However, the attorney that you should get must be someone who is trustworthy — their success or failure in defending you will surely have many repercussions on your life. Hence, you should carefully consider your choice, and some of these simple tips may help you in finding the right criminal defense attorney.

1.  Do some research on the roles played by a defense attorney

Knowing the basic roles of a criminal defense attorney will help you figure out if you really need one or not. Most specifically, a criminal defense lawyer is someone who represents anyone who is charged with criminal conduct or a civil lawsuit. The good thing is that most attorneys can handle both civil and criminal offenses. However, there are really some whose expertise is in criminal defense.

A defense attorney will help you in many ways. First, they can help you with any legal issue pertinent to your case. They can also identify pretrial issues concomitant with your case, and issue motions aimed at dismissing or improving your situation. Moreover, if you go on trial, your defense attorney would then represent you in court with the view in mind of getting you a fair trial or a more positive result.

2.  Ask your friends and relatives if they could recommend a criminal defense attorney

This is the easiest way to find a criminal defense lawyer within your area. If you live, for example, in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, one of your relatives will surely know some attorneys in Chapel Hill, NC whom you can hire on as your defense lawyer.

3.  Figure out if you really need a defense lawyer

When you are charged with any criminal offense, you should readily seek the help of a legal adviser. You need someone to advise you on the implications of your offense even if you don’t intend to hire them as an attorney. This will ensure that you understand the ramifications of the charges filed against you. Your legal adviser then would expound on the possible defense you can take. They will also figure out if you can ask for a plea bargain. Moreover, they will also delineate to you the possible steps you can take if you get convicted.

4.  Consult with a public defender

Public defenders are usually reserved for people who could not afford a private attorney. They generally don’t have enough time to dwell on your case because they have many cases to attend to. Hence, if money is not an issue, you should instead hire someone who could focus on your case.

5.  Look for an expert criminal defense attorney

There are criminal attorneys who have specialties, although all of them routinely do criminal defense cases. However, if money is not an issue, you should ensure that you get the defense attorney who specializes in your type of case. This is crucial to the success of your defense. Hence, you should confirm if the specializations of your prospective defense attorney are completely related to your case.

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Criminal Defense: 10 Questions to Ask Before Hiring an Attorney

So you just got home from jail and now you’re wondering how you’re going to handle your case.

You’ve been offered a public defender, but with the number of cases on their plate, you know your case would never get the attention it needs. You have to be sure you are getting the best representation possible.

But if you’ve never been in this situation before, then how do you know what to look for?

Fortunately, we’ve compiled this list of the 10 best questions to ask prospective criminal defense attorney (or abogado criminal in español) before hiring them.

1. Do You Have Experience With This Type of Case?

Hiring a lawyer is an opportunity for you to have an expert on your side. They should be someone who is familiar with the in’s and out’s of cases like yours and knows how to respond to common questions and arguments in the courtroom.

Lawyers often specialize in parts of the law that are of interest to them. Be sure you locate a lawyer that finds your case meaningful and worthy of investing their time and energy into.

2. What Are the Likely Outcomes of My Case?

No matter how hard your lawyer fights, they can never guarantee that they will win your case.

Even the lawyers at Lucero Law Firm, sometimes have to do their best and walk away.

But your lawyer should be able to give you some idea of what you can expect the outcome of your case to be. They will have come across others like yourself that have been handed down their punishments already and can paint you a picture of the range of expectations you should consider.

3. What Will Fees and Expenses Be?

When you decide to hire a lawyer, the entire cost comes out of your pocket and it can be difficult to come up with all the money. Find out up front what the costs are that are associated with your case.

You won’t only be paying for your lawyer. In the long run, you can also expect to pay fees tacked onto your case by the court as punishment for your crime if you’re convicted.

Make sure that you have an idea of all the potential expenses involved before you commit to anything. The last thing you want is to be left without a lawyer at the end of your case because you ran out of money to retain one.

4. When Will My Payment Be Due?

You should also know when the payment will be due. Many lawyers require that you pay half of their fee up front, while others may allow you to make monthly payments.

5. Do You Have a Strategy in Mind That We Will Use?

When you are charged with a crime, the police will provide evidence against you that proves your involvement. There are many different ways to dispute their charges based on how much information is available to the police and how you acted during the arrest process.

Your potential lawyer will discuss your actions with you and let you know what your best course of action will be. When discussing this, you need to make sure you understand fully the aspects of the defense that your lawyer is proposing.

6. Is There Any Way to Avoid a Trial?

Going to trial is costly, you will have to pay for your lawyer to take the time to come to the courtroom for your case, often more than one time. In addition, you will have to pay court costs for the trial that pay for the time of the judge and prosecutor who have to be there.

These costs can add up quickly. Fortunately, there are many cases that are solved with plea bargains before they ever reach the courtroom. A plea bargain happens when the prosecutor tells you that you can agree not to contest your charges, in exchange for a lighter sentence.

7. How Long Can I Expect My Case to Take?

Depending on how much time it takes to gather the information for your case, and how heavy the caseload is at the courthouse, you could expect your case to take anywhere from a few months to a few years.

Your lawyer should be able to paint you a good idea of the timeline for this which will help you to make financial decisions in the meantime.

8. How Often Can I Expect to Hear From You?

The first time you meet your attorney is often when bail is set. After that first interaction, you may or may not hear from them often.

Lawyers often have many different clients that they are working with all at the same time. That means that you probably won’t hear from your lawyer every day or even every month.

Talk to your lawyer about what expectations you should have.

9. What Do I Need to Do to Prepare for Court?

On the day of your trial or plea agreement, you will need to dress properly and arrive on time. In addition, you may need to bring certain documentation with you. Your lawyer will be able to let you know what you need.

10. What Potential Punishments am I Facing and How Likely are They?

For every crime, there are standards of punishment issued by the government. But based on your criminal history as well as the factors involved in the crime, you could receive a wide variety of sanctions.

A qualified lawyer will be able to tell you what the potential punishments are for your crime so that you are ready for any outcome.

Hiring an Attorney That Will Work for You

Now that you have your questions prepared, you’re ready to start hiring an attorney. Check out our listings to find the right one for you!

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5 Tips To Choose the Best Criminal Defense Lawyer

There are over 1.3 million active attorneys in the United States. How do you begin to choose a lawyer when there are so many to choose from? They can’t all be great lawyers.

Choosing a criminal defense lawyer is a big decision. Here are 5 tips to help you choose the best criminal defense lawyer for you.

Criminal Defense Lawyer Choosing Tips

1. The Best Criminal Defense Lawyer for You

Choosing a lawyer is not just about choosing the best criminal lawyer. Yes, you want to find a good criminal lawyer but you want the best one for you. That means you want one who is going to meet your needs and must understand the whole matter.

You need a lawyer you can understand. Someone who talks your language and takes time to explain your options. Look for a lawyer who will act as your adviser and who you feel comfortable with.  It is also critical that they have a firm grasp of all the best criminal defense attorney strategies that can be used to win your case.

2. A Lawyer with the Right Experience

Not all lawyers are the same. Some specialize in personal injury and others in criminal law.

Even criminal lawyers may specialize. Some are newbie, some are experienced.

Your case also has a type. If your case is about violent crime then don’t get a lawyer whose only experience is driving under the influence (of drugs). Check out their website and see what cases they specialize in. A specialized and experienced one can easily understand and handle your case.

For example, here is a Philadelphia criminal defense attorney with a wide range of criminal law experience.

3. Check the Team

Preparing a case for the court is not a one-person job. Even a very good defense lawyer needs a team behind them. Check to see whether there are an administrative team, paralegals, and other criminal lawyers in Greensboro NC backing up your lawyer.

If you have the best criminal lawyer in the business but he gets sick, will you have another member of his team ready to step in? Will they be up to the job? Ask to meet other members of the team and ask about their skills and experience. Afterall a good team is essential for your case.

4. Check References

Find a good criminal lawyer and you will find a reputation to match. Ask friends and associates for recommendations. Ask for references and talk to previous clients.

Good lawyers have a reputation within their profession. Ask other lawyers to recommend a criminal lawyer. They don’t have to be criminal lawyers themselves to know who has a good reputation in the profession.

Criminal Defence Lawyer5. Confident but No Guarantees

Find a criminal lawyer who is confident that they will build the strongest case possible. An air of confidence is a helpful trait in a lawyer. Be skeptical of any lawyer who guarantees you a specific result.

The law is uncertain. Even the best criminal lawyer cannot predict exactly what will happen.  If, God forbid, you lose your case you can always hire an appeals attorney.

Don’t be taken in by a lawyer who promises you the earth.

Take Your Time, Choose Carefully

Facing criminal charges is a worrying prospect. This is not something to take lightly. You need to get the best help you can if you hope to get the best outcome you can.

Getting the best criminal defense lawyer is important to spend some time and effort in researching your options. Select the right lawyer for you.

For more advice about the law, click here.

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St. Paul DWI Attorney – Drunk Driving Defenses in Minnesota

When the police pull a person over, they are breathalyzed and charged with a DWI; it seems like an impossible situation to “get out of”.

While, most drivers will not get away with it scott-free; there have been some pretty unbelievable cases of people who were clearly guilty of driving with a high BAC getting the proverbial slap on the wrist. This miracle is usually the result of the driver hiring a top DWI attorney that is knowledgeable about the laws in the specific state and region of arrest.

Leverson Budke Criminal Defense

295 Marie Ave E #240
St. Paul, MN 55118

(651) 829-3572
skbudke@leversonbudke.com
nrleverson@leversonbudke.com

State Specific

The United States are uniform with regards to DWI law in that the legal limit for alcohol in the blood stream while driving is .08. This is approximately 2 standard sized drinks in an hour depending on weight and gender.

Other than that, each state has its own unique set of DWI laws. States like Minnesota have relatively lenient DWI laws. So much so, that a man was arrested in October, 2017 for driving while intoxicated for the 28th time in his life. Worse yet, he had a valid driver’s license. Issues like this have led to a call to action for Minnesota revamping their DWI laws.

Stricter states like New York can and will revoke a license indefinitely after three DWI’s within a certain period of time.

I Got Drunk After I Was Driving

An affirmative defense to a DWI charge is exactly what it sounds like. A Defendant is “affirming” that they were drunk and behind the wheel but they are defending their actions with some kind of reason.

There are only two affirmative defenses to a DWI in Minnesota.

The first affirmative defense is that the alcohol was consumed after driving and before the breathalyzer was given. In this situation, the Defendant is saying, “Yes, I was impaired, but not while I was driving”. The Defendant must prove that they drank enough after driving and within two hours of when they were behind the wheel to cause a high BAC.

An example of a scenario like this may be if a person got into an accident and then went inside and had a few drinks while waiting for the police to arrive (not likely). The police would see that the person is drunk and issue a DWI. If it  can be proven that the suspect was not drunk when they were driving and they got drunk afterward then the suspect may be free of criminal liability.

Prescription Medication

The second affirmative defense in Minnesota is for being under the influence of prescribed medication. This defense is basically saying, “Yes, I was impaired but the doctor gave me these pills”. The inherent problem with this defense is the fact that every bottle of pills that could possibly impair a person comes with a clear warning to not drive or operate heavy machinery while taking.

There are several other defenses and legal maneuvers for DWI charges. Only an attorney could possibly know what laws to use and how to apply them to a specific case.

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The Basics Of Assault And Battery Laws

Although the specifics vary from state to state, assault and battery laws typically involve the same charges and acts. When someone engages in assault and battery, they usually either try to hit or strike someone or they threaten another person to cause fear of harm in order to get that person to behave in a particular manner. There are different types of assault and battery charges based on the severity of the behavior. The most egregious behaviors are typically classified as “aggravated” assault and battery, because they pose more potentially dangerous and serious consequences to the victim.  

An aggravated assault charge involves a situation when someone tries to severely injure another individual, or they use a deadly weapon to threaten or actually harm someone. The charge of assault and battery is generally used when there is a fight or some type of altercation that involves two or more people. There are some legal constructs, however, that will involve those who just use the threat of violence without following through in order to coerce someone else. The following are the definitions related to assault and battery laws.

Assault

Although the details differ from state to state, assault is essentially defined as the attempt to injure or harm someone. It can involve either physical action or intimidating behaviors against someone else. Another form of assault is “attempted battery,” which is when someone uses force through making threats that cause someone believe that if they don’t comply, they are in jeopardy of harm. The difference between an actual battery and when someone assaults you is whether or not someone makes physical contact. If someone is just offensive, then it is usually not battery; it is just defined as assault.

The requirements for labeling an assault

If you want to convict someone of assault, there needs to be some sort of “criminal act” that took place. The type of actions that would constitute an assault can vary widely in definition based on location, but it typically means that someone directly or overtly acts against someone in a way that would reasonably be interpreted as attempting to cause fear. The theory of reasonability means that if anyone else were under the same conditions, they would likewise feel threatened and fearful.

The intent requirement

To prove that someone perpetrated assault and battery you have to be able to prove that they intentionally either meant to actually harm or threatened to harm you. If it is just a perception that you have, then they likely can’t be charged with assault and battery. For someone to face assault and battery charges, you have to prove that they had the intent of causing harm or of threatening you.

For a battery charge there needs to be an act

For someone to be charged with assault and battery, there needs to be an actual act of battery or harm. It isn’t enough for someone to threaten you or to make you fearful. Battery involves someone overtly acting in a way designed to harm you. There needs to be a physical altercation of some sort that goes beyond just threats or intimidation. To have someone charged with assault and battery the components that need to be in place are that you felt fear and that the other person harmed you physically. If you can’t prove both components, then the other person is not likely to be charged with assault and battery.

If you have been charged with assault and battery, there are many things that need to be proven. It isn’t enough to make someone feel threatened or intimidated; to be charged with assault and battery, there needs to be a physical action that not just intimidates but harms another individual. To minimize any potential fallout that can come from being found guilty of assault and battery, and to prove your innocence in court, it is essential that you hire an assault attorney in Queens to plead your case. They will work either to have the charges thrown out or to plea bargain for a lesser charge. Since most assault and battery cases have an underlying reason, make sure to protect yourself from the consequences of being found guilty.

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The Main Differences: Criminal Defense Attorney vs Lawyer

Going to court is scary. You’re not sure what the outcome will be, what the jury will think, and if you’ll walk out a free person. Fortunately, there are professionals with keen knowledge of the law who will represent you.

Difference Between a Defense Attorney and Lawyer

Whether or not you’re at fault, everyone should be supported by a legal professional. These professionals are lawyers, but people often mistake them for an ‘attorney.’ Before you go to court, you should understand the difference.

Before you contact a lawyer or a defense attorney, understand how each will represent you. Continue reading to understand the difference between a defense attorney vs lawyer.

Lawyer

A lawyer is someone who practices the law. Think of the term ‘lawyer’ and take out the ‘law’ portion. Lawyers are the ones you see in movies — standing up in court, supporting either the plaintiff or the defendant.

But lawyers do more than fight for you in court. They offer transparency when discussing your case and they can give you legal advice.

The Duties of a Lawyer

Lawyers hold more lawful obligation. You can find thoroughly trained in law professionals with Service Care Solutions and some give sound legal advice. Because of this, they have a strict code of ethics.

Lawyers can decide to specialize in a certain field or hold a specific position. Lawyers can also choose to hold various roles.

In court, a lawyer can act as a superior or as support. In these roles, the lawyer defends the client by providing evidence to benefit the client in their case.

Depending on the case, the lawyer will debate and fight for their client’s freedom. These lawyers are also called a barrister.

Throughout the case, the lawyer can act as an adviser. This is when the lawyer guides, counsels and instructs their client on the legal issues surrounding their case.

These lawyers, also called solicitors, cannot help you in court unless your case goes to a lower court.

Lawyers can also take on additional roles, such as trial works. These lawyers conduct research, interview clients, interview witnesses, and gather additional details to use in court.

Different Fields

In the modern day, lawyers have private practices and open up their services to a myriad of different cases. These cases generally surround criminals or those who charge others with a crime.

But there are still lawyers who specialize in certain fields and roles. These include:

  • Environmental Lawyer –a lawyer who specializes in cases such as clean technology, water law, climate change law, and public land.
  • Intellectual Property Lawyer — a lawyer who protects inventions, trade secrets, and product names.
  • DUI Defense Lawyer – a criminal lawyer with expertise in defending drunk driving charges, such as this DUI lawyer in Los Angeles.
  • Civil Law Lawyer — a lawyer who helps their clients with wills, trusts, and contracts.
  • Nonprofit Lawyer — a lawyer who supports and advocates nonprofit organizations.
  • Criminal Defense Lawyer — a lawyer who defends clients who are accused of a crime, such as Criminal Solicitors.

When to Hire a Lawyer

While not required in court, hiring a lawyer is highly recommended. You’ll want to hire a lawyer when:

  • You’re in a position where legal representation is necessary
  • You could go to jail
  • You could lose money
  • Your opponent has a lawyer
  • Your case involves in personal injury
  • You’re going through a difficult divorce
  • You’re administering the estate of a deceased person
  • You’re conducting estate planning
  • You’re adopting a child
  • You have to negotiate a difficult contract
  • Any complex business matter

These are all broad reasons, and in some of these cases, self-representation can work. If you find a lawyer who offers a free consultation, it’s worth seeking their advice.

Defense Attorney

An attorney is someone who conducts business for someone else. In some cases, a defense attorney is almost similar to a lawyer in a defense attorney vs lawyer argument. That’s because a defense attorney can represent you in court.

This is why you hear terms such as ‘attorneys-at-law’ (an attorney who can represent their clients in court) and ‘power of attorney’ (a document stating the power the attorney has over a business).

But there’s a difference between a lawyer and a defense attorney. An attorney regularly conducts business with an individual or an establishment. This is why attorneys are also referred as an ‘agent.’

An attorney can’t provide court services unless they’re a ‘defense attorney at law.’ To establish this title, a defense attorney needs to have the same qualifications as a lawyer.

The Duties of an Attorney

An attorney, especially an attorney-at-law, works similarly to a lawyer. This is why it’s hard to differentiate a defense  attorney vs lawyer.

These include resolving cases, working to save clients’ money in court, act as advisors for clients, prepare pleadings and other legal documents, prepare contracts, and prosecute cases.

The main difference between a defense attorney and a lawyer is an attorney’s relationship with the client. This relationship is stated in the power of defense attorney document.

Because the attorney’s duties are limited to this document, a defense attorney can take on many roles. They can simply sign off on loan or can support their client when their client is sued in court.

The main difference between a defense attorney and a lawyer is an attorney’s duties aren’t subjected to court.

A business may hire a defense attorney to handle their legal documents or an individual may hire an attorney to supervise the purchase of an estate.

Different Fields

Like a lawyer, an attorney can choose to stay broad or specialize in different fields and positions. For specialized cases, it’s hard to decide between an attorney vs lawyer.

An attorney can share certain field similarities with lawyers, such as civil law. But since attorneys act as agents, they’re open to a variety of other positions. These include:

  • Corporate and Securities Attorney
  • Education Attorney
  • Employment or Labor Attorney
  • Family and Juvenile Attorney
  • Health Attorney
  • Immigration Attorney
  • International Attorney
  • Real Estate Attorney
  • Sports and Entertainment Attorney
  • Tax Attorney

These specialties can be given to a lawyer, but an attorney acts as an agent for these fields and organizations.

Now You Know the Different Between an Attorney Vs Lawyer

Attorneys and lawyers are extremely similar law professionals, so it’s common to mix up these titles.

But there are slight differences between the two. A lawyer practices the law, assisting clients in court. A defense attorney is an agent of the law, assisting their clients with various legal processes in and out of court.

Are you a lawyer or defense attorney? Look at our services and post a directory listing.

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Updates To Canadian Criminal Code Are Necessary. Now You Can Practice Witchcraft Again!

Written inside the pages of Canada’s criminal code are things that are so antiquated, they no longer have relevance in today’s society. So, that which doesn’t hurt you should just remain, right? Perhaps not. There are many laws with wording that might end up unwittingly hurting a Canadian citizen if taken literally. With over 1200 pages, the criminal code has been revamped, added to, and overruled many times. But what it has never been is looked through, to discover what makes sense in the here and now and what doesn’t – up until recently.

Last week the penal code got an upgrade. Many sections are wildly out of date and context, but the one targeted last week was Section 71, which prohibits you from challenging anyone to a duel. If you do, apparently you can face up to two years in prison, which is not the only reason why the practice disappeared. It was likely a factor back when it was something Canadian citizens considered. The upgrade is not just about a duel invitation being overhauled, though. Section 365, which stops anyone from “pretending” to practice witchcraft, has likewise been stricken from the books. So for all those out there who want to have an old-fashioned duel or to take out the book of spells, you are once again free to do so.

Also allowed are “crime comics,” which were banned after World War II for inciting youth delinquency. If that law was used today to guide the media, then there would likely be many people on trial for comic heresy. So, who is responsible for finally coming to common sense and starting to take a look at all the unnecessary things that are clogging up the Canadian criminal code? Jody Wilson-Raybould. Her proposed bill C-51 (not the same as the terrorism bill) lifts the prohibitions placed on:

  • Duels of any kind
  • Giving thieves a reward for returning stolen goods without any questions asked
  • Slanderous remarks about religion or blasphemous libel
  • Pretending to engage in witchcraft
  • The issuance of trading stamps
  • Taking an exam for someone else under false pretenses
  • Claiming that you are a royal warrant so that you can advertise that you have the monarchy’s permission to produce goods

Mostly stemming from the Colonial days, none of the above laws that would hold up in today’s criminal court. Some of them have already been struck down by the Supreme Court and declared unconstitutional.

This isn’t the first time that legislators have attempted to bring the Canadian criminal code into the here and now. Last year the federal government took steps to change gender-charged language and legislation that discriminates against a specific sexual preference. The legislation was introduced last year to repeal the anal sex consent age due to the fact that it unfairly singled out the homosexual population, and therefore was a means to discriminate.

So what is so harmful about antiquated laws?

When laws are in the criminal code, they are still the law, regardless of whether they are relevant or not. One example is how Canada has had to revamp rape laws to shield the victim; legislators made it illegal for a victim’s past sexual history or promiscuity to be a part of the trial. Currently, you can’t make anything about the victim’s sexual history admissible to a rape trial to prove consent, as you could in the past.

There is no argument that going through the entire criminal code would be arduous at best, and likely completely impossible. Most of the laws that no longer apply have been challenged and overturned in the courts. But if someone were really looking, it might be possible to use the criminal code of the past to prosecute future defendants in an unfair way.

As times change the laws pertaining to Canadian society have had to change with them. The problem is that you can’t rewrite history, nor can you just take a criminal code and scrap it for a new one. Within the deep recesses of the penal code are the ideas not just of legal scholars, but Canadian society at large about how to treat people with respect, grant them true constitutional rights, and undo things that were once harmful but accepted. So for all of you out there who have had money stolen, feel free to hire the best criminal lawyer without any questions asked for your money being returned – it is legal once again!

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5 Reasons You Need a Traffic Violation Lawyer

Every year, about 41 million Americans earn themselves a speeding ticket. Keep in mind, speeding is not the only traffic lawyer violation.

If you run a red light, drive without a valid license, hit the road when impaired, drive a vehicle with burned-out headlights or fail to yield, you’ll be guilty of a traffic lawyer violation.

Why You Should Hire a Traffic Lawyer Violation?

While some violations are less serious and fairly straightforward to resolve, others – like DUI and hit and run – are serious and can get you behind bars.

If you’re being charged with a traffic lawyer, it can be tempting to fight the charge alone. You can either pay the parking ticket fee online on NJMCDirect or Don’t.

1. You Don’t Understand Traffic Law

Sure, traffic laws aren’t the most complicated, but that doesn’t mean just about anyone can understand them.

If you’ve violated a traffic law, now is not the time to start researching the specific law and the potential consequences. You’ll be too distraught to understand anything.

Traffic Lawyer Gets you a Competent Professional

On the other hand, hiring a traffic lawyer gets you a competent professional with an in-depth understanding of federal laws and state and local traffic codes. The lawyer has probably spent several years defending clients in traffic courts, so you’ll feel confident having them on your side.

They will evaluate the case brought against you, identify weakness and aggressively fight the ticket on your behalf.

Can you imagine cross-examining a police officer by yourself in a traffic court? No way! A traffic lawyer violation has the skills to question the officer with the aim of raising reasonable doubt as to your guilt.

2. Dismiss/Lower Ticket Penalties

Did you know Americans pay north of $6 billion worth of speeding tickets annually?

This is a huge amount. It means when you get a traffic ticket, you’ll certainly have to pay a fine.

When You are a New Offender

If you’re a first or second-time offender, it usually seems easier to settle the fine and move on with your life. But here is the thing, some tickets are wrongly issued, and others can quickly add up. A $500 speeding ticket, for instance, can hurt your bank account.

For those reasons, the best thing to do is to hire a traffic lawyer violation. He or she can contest the penalty, or explain your circumstances in a traffic court and get the judge to lower your penalty or even dismiss it entirely.

Obviously, getting a lower fine is good for the wallet, but there is more to it. When a penalty is dismissed, you typically won’t accumulate points on your driving license. The outcome is your DL won’t be suspended.

3. Gathering Evidence Information

You’re very certain you didn’t skip a red light, but here you’re slapped with a red light ticket.

Who is right? Who is wrong? The only way to establish the truth is to contest the ticket.

If your state or local authority has installed traffic cameras along the road you were on, it’s possible to collect the footage or incident reports.

Bypassing the Typical Bureaucracy

The problem is, as a regular person, you might even not be aware that you can get video footage. And if you are aware, bypassing the typical bureaucracy of public offices can prove challenging.

The best thing you can do in such a situation is to hire a traffic lawyer violation.

These professionals know their way around bureaucratic government offices and can easily gain access to the video footage. Needless to say, if the footage proves you didn’t run a red light, the lawyer will ensure the ticket is dismissed.

You can even instruct the lawyer to sue the traffic officer for writing a false ticket.

4. Get Alternative Discipline

The vast majority of traffic offenders are usually guilty as charged.

Although hiring a lawyer enhances your chances of getting a reduced penalty, this is not always the case. If the prosecutor has substantial evidence against you, there is little a lawyer can do.

It Depends on Your Records

However, depending on your record, a competent lawyer can be able to negotiate an alternative discipline.

A common alternative to a fine or suspended license is attending driving or traffic school! Well, going back to school is not an interesting prospect, but would you rather lose your license or pay costly fines?

5. Save Money

One of the primary reasons traffic violators don’t hire lawyers is cost. They often wrongly assume it’s cheaper to settle a fine or serve a probationary period than hire an attorney.

It’s true, routine violations don’t need a lawyer, especially if you’re a first-time offender. But when you’ve committed a serious offense, you shouldn’t fight the charge alone in a bid to save money. You could actually end up spending even more money.

If You Lose the Case

For instance, the violation will show up on your driving record. The more points you have on your record, the higher the premiums you’ll pay for auto insurance.

A lawyer can ensure the violation isn’t added to your driving record, thereby preventing you from higher insurance premiums.

Beyond saving money, you’ll also save time. For a small fee, a traffic violation lawyer will handle all the paperwork on your behalf, and represent you in a traffic court where necessary, you may find free lawyer from here.

Hiring a Traffic Lawyer Violation Is the Right Step

As a law-abiding citizen, it’s never your intention to violate a traffic law. However, sometimes circumstances beyond our control lead us into legal trouble.

If you’re facing a traffic ticket or charge, you could be tempted to contest or fight it on your own, but as we’ve demonstrated, it’s not a risk worth taking. Hiring a traffic violation lawyer gives you the best chance of getting the ticket penalty reduced or dismissed.

Don’t waste any more time. Find a lawyer today.

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